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KIDSPIRIT MAGAZINE, A UNIQUE QUARTERLY MAGAZINE BY AND FOR YOUTH, GOES TO PRESS

17 Apr

For Immediate Release


KIDSPIRIT MAGAZINE, A UNIQUE QUARTERLY MAGAZINE BY AND FOR YOUTH, GOES TO PRESS

Nonprofit magazine about life's "Big Questions" is created by and for young teens

KidSpirit Magazine, a new Brooklyn-based magazine with an all-kid Editorial Board, is trying to empower kids eleven to fifteen to explore values, spirituality and life's big questions in an explicitly non-affiliated and inclusive forum. KidSpirit, the only youth-driven spiritual magazine of its kind, releases its Premiere Issue in April, 2008. It is ad-free and printed in full color on recycled paper.

Recent polls show that the United States is one of the most religious countries in the world. A 2005 Harris poll found that roughly half of the teens in the country feel that religion is "extremely/very important" in their lives and an AP/MTV poll conducted in 2007 reached two striking conclusions: young people who describe themselves as very religious or spiritual tend to be happier than those that don't; and they are generally tolerant of the beliefs of their peers.

While the number of kids' magazines subscriptions purchased each year approaches ten million, most of what is available is driven by popular trends and celebrity news. KidSpirit Magazine aims to reach a national audience and to offer a probing alternative to the flood of commercial teen magazines.

The Premiere Issue features young writers tackling complex issues including the relationship between spirituality and nature, climate change, Tai Chi Chuan, along with original poetry, book reviews, and artwork.

The young Editorial Board meets monthly to discuss upcoming themes, edit articles and engage each other on what they dub the "big questions." In the words of their Mission Statement, KidSpirit "is a coed magazine for deep thinkers with big ideas. It is a unique forum for kids who are curious about the meaning of life."

Kids working on KidSpirit feel empowered to express their ideas in their own voice. Anna, an eighth grader on the Editorial Board, is passionate about the magazine's purpose: "We're kids trying to talk to kids about important matters. We are the future; we need to share who we are and our ideas..." Another young editor, Tyler, says that KidSpirit "allows kids to express their feelings about the world." He adds that "it is a very personal magazine and all kids can relate to." A fourteen year old named Susan, says that before writing for KidSpirit, she hadn't really reflected on spiritual topics with people her age, but that since she has been writing for the magazine, feels that KidSpirit "has provided [her] with a real spiritual outlet."

Through the process of creating and editing the content, starting with the Editorial Board and expanding through the interaction made possible on their web site (http://www.kidspiritmagazine.com/), KidSpirit is facilitating meaningful discussions among young adolescents in an unprecedented way.

For further information or to interview Founding Editor Elizabeth Dabney Hochman, contact Emily Condon at (612) 203-1142 or email her at info@kidspiritmagazine.com.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


Contact: Elizabeth Dabney Hochman
Telephone: (917) 734-8451
Email: info@kidspiritmagazine.com

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